Additional living expenses, or loss-of-use coverage is typically a fixed amount – 20% of your dwelling coverage. However, if you live in an area prone to wildfires or hurricanes, it's worth checking with your insurer to see if they offer higher coverage limits in the event a catastrophe forces you from your home for an extended period. Additional living expenses can add up, so it may be worth the added peace of mind to increase this coverage component.
In the 2018 midterm elections, ballot measures passed in both Missouri and Utah legalizing the use of medical marijuana. This means that in total, 32 states and Washington D.C. now allow for the medicinal use of cannabis. So can you use your health insurance to help pay for it? Due to the U.S. government's classification of the plant as a Schedule I drug, you can't use Medicare to pay for medical marijuana because it technically doesn't have any accepted medical use. Private insurers won’t cover it either, partially because the Food and Drug Administration hasn’t approved it for use. If you’re outside of the U.S. you’ll have more luck. With the legalization of recreational marijuana use in Canada in 2018, Sun Life Financial is now offering plans that cover medical marijuana use.
One of the big perks of insuring your home through Metlife is that they offer guaranteed replacement cost coverage – meaning if your home or stuff is damaged or destroyed by a covered peril, your home’s rebuild costs and property will receive the full replacement cost, depreciation notwithstanding. That means if your home is only worth $250,000 but it costs $500,000 to replace, Metlife will pay the full $500,000 to replace your home.
Middle Income: If your income is above the threshold of $45,960 (adjusted), you will not qualify for subsidized health insurance. Those above the poverty rate can still shop for insurance via an exchange but will not benefit from subsidies. However, income thresholds change depending on household size, so it is worth finding out if you qualify. Individuals can also shop for insurance through one of the major carriers, including those listed in this review, such as Humana, Kaiser Permanente or Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS), depending on what is available in your area. In most cases you can expect to pay about $300 to $600 per month in premiums for individual insurance. If you don't know if your income qualifies for subsidies, you can use one of the exchange calculators to help you figure that out. Another option for healthy mid-income individuals is high-deductible health plans. These plans have a deductible of up to $6,600, but will have a lower monthly premium and will help you pay major expenses.
State Farm Bank, F.S.B. Bloomington, Illinois, is a Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender. NMLS ID 139716. The other products offered by affiliate companies of State Farm Bank are not FDIC insured, not a State Farm Bank obligation or guaranteed by State Farm Bank, and subject to investment risk, including possible loss of principal invested. Contact State Farm Bank toll-free at 877-SF4-BANK (877-734-2265). 
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