While State Farm’s website recommends speaking with an agent to see what discounts are available to you for motorhome insurance, it doesn’t list any universal discounts. It’s still possible to save on your premiums, but there’s less transparency about what you may qualify for. If discounts are important to you, it’s best to get clarity from a State Farm agent on what to expect before signing up.
Bus-conversion homes are a popular and fast-growing trend within the RV lifestyle. City buses, Greyhounds, and even school buses are highly sought after and, once renovated, become non-traditional RVs that fall into the Class A category. While bus renovation projects are becoming mainstream, they can be difficult to insure. Buses, especially school bus-converted homes or “Skoolies,” are considered more of a risk due to their weight and balance limitations. Vehicles originally built for mass transportation do not have the same axle and weight distribution as traditional RVs, which are designed for sleeping and carrying additional living necessities.

Though Safeco’s app boasts a high 4.7 rating with over 5,000 ratings in the Apple App Store and an average 4.1 rating in Google Play, the reviews tell a different story. The most common complaint is that the app simply redirects you to the Safeco website, which is poorly formatted for mobile use. Many reviews also report that the app routinely crashes, which frustrated customers enough that they deleted the app and used their computers to access the Safeco website. The company has responded to say that it is actively working on improving functionality and adding offline features, but in the meantime, it’s likely that using the app is a frustrating experience.
Coverage for a wide variety of RV types may be obtained through RVInsurance.com. Class A, B, and C Motorhomes, Fifth-Wheel and Conventional Travel Trailers, Airstream Trailers, Trucks Campers, Bus Conversions, Toy Haulers, Horse Trailers, Pop-up Tent Trailers, and other specialty and custom RVs can all be covered by the company’s insurance options. The experts at RVInsurance.com are able to find insurance coverage for any kind of RV or motorhome clients might drive.
According to Greg Gerber, “Most car insurance firms don’t have a clue of what can go wrong with an RV and don’t provide the coverage to get it fixed adequately,” which is why he advises consumers to get a separate policy for their RVs instead of bundling, to “avoid the hassle that can come if the RV itself is broken and they’re trying to get their car insurance company to fix it.” 
There isn’t a definitive answer to the question, “which company is the cheapest?” Some companies are cheaper than others, plain and simple, but individual details of your driving profile can affect which companies offer you the cheapest rates. For example, while Nationwide wasn’t the cheapest for a driver with a clean record, it was the relatively cheap for a driver following an at-fault accident. The best way to find cheap car insurance is to compare as many companies as possible using your driving profile.

RV insurance isn’t the same thing as auto insurance, though many providers give you the option to bundle the two. But RVs have specialized concerns. To start, they can carry many more people than cars, and they cost more to repair. In addition to basic coverage, RV insurance can also offer more extensive protection, with coverage for personal belongings, emergency expenses for lodging, and higher damage rates.
Auto insurance is financial protection, and not just for the investment you made when you bought your car. After a really serious accident, bills for damage and injuries can easily reach into hundreds of thousands of dollars. If you happen to cause such a wreck, the victims could sue you. In the worst case scenario, assets such as your savings and home could be seized.
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