In a best-case scenario, you’ll never have to use your car insurance. After all, making a claim on your auto insurance means you’ve suffered some sort of loss, and no one wants that. However, going through life without ever having a fender bender or other damage to your car is unlikely. In some cases, you’ll be making a car insurance claim after a harrowing experience, like a serious accident. After going through something like that, you want to be sure your insurance company isn’t going to make things worse.
Collision coverage has a deductible, which is the amount you pay before your coverage helps pay for your claim. You can typically choose the amount of your deductible when you buy coverage. So, if you choose a $1,000 deductible and your car is later damaged in a covered accident, you'd have to pay $1,000 toward repair costs. Your collision coverage would help pay the rest, up to your coverage limit.
Allstate is more reasonable in terms of pricing, and came out cheapest for drivers under 25 according to our quotes. Both J.D. Power and Consumer Reports readers rated it just a hair lower than State Farm overall, but at the top for claims satisfaction. So we were puzzled to see its complaint index was the highest by far among the top five, and the only one considered above average for all Texas insurers. Since the most common consumer complaint is that payments are too low, it seems likely that Allstate is stingier in its claims determinations than most companies. Its financial strength, while not quite top-tier, is good enough that you’ll never have to worry about getting paid; the bigger question is whether you’ll be satisfied with the amount.
I always chuckled when someone said I saved blah blah blah on my car insurance. Then my car insurance went up by $269 for a 6 month period…so I called Standard Insurance. They were so nice and once the call was done I had saved $1400 on my car and homeowners insurance. I am now a believer and a Standard Insurance customer! I couldn’t be happier. Thanks Standard Insurance!
In the 2018 midterm elections, ballot measures passed in both Missouri and Utah legalizing the use of medical marijuana. This means that in total, 32 states and Washington D.C. now allow for the medicinal use of cannabis. So can you use your health insurance to help pay for it? Due to the U.S. government's classification of the plant as a Schedule I drug, you can't use Medicare to pay for medical marijuana because it technically doesn't have any accepted medical use. Private insurers won’t cover it either, partially because the Food and Drug Administration hasn’t approved it for use. If you’re outside of the U.S. you’ll have more luck. With the legalization of recreational marijuana use in Canada in 2018, Sun Life Financial is now offering plans that cover medical marijuana use.
Vox published an analysis of more than 1,100 emergency room bills in December 2018 that found emergency rooms often charge a lot for items you could buy at a drugstore such as bandages and low-grade pain medication. If you’re at the doctor for something relatively minor, consider asking if you’ll be charged for these supplies, and if so, turn them down. You can always stop at the store on the way home and get them for far less money. Whatever private health insurance you have, it’s important to know your benefits well.
State Farm Bank, F.S.B. Bloomington, Illinois, is a Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender. NMLS ID 139716. The other products offered by affiliate companies of State Farm Bank are not FDIC insured, not a State Farm Bank obligation or guaranteed by State Farm Bank, and subject to investment risk, including possible loss of principal invested. Contact State Farm Bank toll-free at 877-SF4-BANK (877-734-2265). 
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